Working the Curve

curves - sass - elegance

Summer 2014 Relaunch

Hello, lovelies! I’m sorry I’ve been away for so long. I’m about to do my last semester of school (starting in August), and these last couple of semesters have been kicking my butt and making me feel pretty un-fabulous.

But I’m getting back on the cute-stuff train and getting together some new posts for you beautiful ladies! 

While I’m working on that, please, shoot me a message if there’s something in particular you’d like to see! <3 

Hello, all!
I know updates have been spotty, recently, but this semester&#8217;s workload is kind of killing me. &gt;_&lt;; 
Anyways! I got out of bed today and thought, &#8220;I&#8217;m going to have a Blair Waldorf fashion day.&#8221; And I wanted to text that to my roommate, but I realized that she has no idea who Blair Waldorf is, because she doesn&#8217;t share my deeply unfortunate addiction to ridiculous television.
So, anyways, that led me to today&#8217;s topic: my fashion icons, both in real life and fictional. 
-
Blair Waldorf - Gossip Girl

Blair is a character on the show Gossip Girl, played by Leighton Meester.  While I find many of Meester&#8217;s personal fashion choices a little bit questionable, her character is known for a vintage style, and is always classy, elegant, and well put together&#8212; mostly because she&#8217;s grossly wealthy. 

I am not grossly wealthy. I am a college student who tries really hard not to buy too much coffee. 
The trick to referencing her look? Higher or sweetheart necklines, lace accents, cropped jackets/wraps, accent headpieces (headbands, berets, or cloche hats), stockings, and low heels. Today, the outfit that sparked this, I wore a black and brown version of this dress&#8212; 

&#8212;over a crinoline, belted with a black belt, with black leggings, a black knitted shrug, a black wool beret, black flats, and three strands of glass pearls. The leggings were $5 at WalMart, the dress $6 at my local Goodwill, the pearls were five strands for $1 at a local independent thrift shop, the belt was $3 at that same Goodwill, the crinoline was $11 on eBay, the shoes were $12 at Target,  the shrug was on clearance for $7 at Coldwater Creek, and the beret was $2 at Ross. Blair&#8217;s fashion is surprisingly adaptable to the curvy girl&#8212; crinolines, belts, and stockings in the right combination, with natural fabrics (cotton, wool, etc) and antique accents where applicable. 
-
Z Berg - The Like

Z is the lead singer for the Like, a retro girl pop band. Her style is characterized by a 1960&#8217;s look, short or babydoll skirts/dresses, bright/bold colors (usually reds or yellows) paired with delicate ivory or beige, over stockings/knee socks, contrasting sharply with large and dark eye makeup. 

I copy her eye makeup more days than I don&#8217;t (see my post on makeup), and I often use her technique of a delicate, vintage color/pattern next to a bold, modern pop of color. Often normal waisted dresses become babydoll dresses&#8212; short, empire waisted&#8212; on me due to my bust, and when it looks good, I forgo the belt and finish it off with knee socks and a really long necklace. 

-
Olivia White - Lemonade Mouth

Yes, okay, some of my fashion comes from the Disney Channel. Don&#8217;t knock it. To be fair, it accidentally came from the Disney Channel&#8212; which is to say, I watched this movie and went, &#8220;&#8230;She&#8217;s wearing my clooootheeesssss, that&#8217;s weeeiiiiirrrrd.&#8221; Olivia&#8217;s fashion is characterized by, hey, wow, look at that, bright but casual skirts and dresses in feminine prints, with high and wide waists, paired with cardigans/vests/shrugs, short leggings, and ridiculous earrings. Much like my daily staples. 

I don&#8217;t feel like I need to tell you how I adapt this, because&#8230; I don&#8217;t. This is what I wear automatically on any given day. Uh. Yeah. 

-
Holland Roden - cast of Teen Wolf

Holland plays Lydia Martin on MTV&#8217;s Teen Wolf, which is, incidentally, filmed where I live. Her style is usually very 1950&#8217;s, with a lot of red lipstick and accent headbands, high but narrower waists, and bold primary colors, especially yellow. 

I often go for bright lipstick and a contrasting, but equally bright, primary color when I&#8217;m wanting to draw from her look. I go for narrower belts than I usually would, and go for sheer stockings or bare legs rather than my usual leggings or patterned tights. 

How do you adapt the styles you love to work for your body and your budget? 

Hello, all!

I know updates have been spotty, recently, but this semester’s workload is kind of killing me. >_<; 

Anyways! I got out of bed today and thought, “I’m going to have a Blair Waldorf fashion day.” And I wanted to text that to my roommate, but I realized that she has no idea who Blair Waldorf is, because she doesn’t share my deeply unfortunate addiction to ridiculous television.

So, anyways, that led me to today’s topic: my fashion icons, both in real life and fictional. 

-

Blair Waldorf - Gossip Girl

Blair is a character on the show Gossip Girl, played by Leighton Meester.  While I find many of Meester’s personal fashion choices a little bit questionable, her character is known for a vintage style, and is always classy, elegant, and well put together— mostly because she’s grossly wealthy. 

I am not grossly wealthy. I am a college student who tries really hard not to buy too much coffee. 

The trick to referencing her look? Higher or sweetheart necklines, lace accents, cropped jackets/wraps, accent headpieces (headbands, berets, or cloche hats), stockings, and low heels. Today, the outfit that sparked this, I wore a black and brown version of this dress— 

—over a crinoline, belted with a black belt, with black leggings, a black knitted shrug, a black wool beret, black flats, and three strands of glass pearls. The leggings were $5 at WalMart, the dress $6 at my local Goodwill, the pearls were five strands for $1 at a local independent thrift shop, the belt was $3 at that same Goodwill, the crinoline was $11 on eBay, the shoes were $12 at Target,  the shrug was on clearance for $7 at Coldwater Creek, and the beret was $2 at Ross. Blair’s fashion is surprisingly adaptable to the curvy girl— crinolines, belts, and stockings in the right combination, with natural fabrics (cotton, wool, etc) and antique accents where applicable. 

-

Z Berg - The Like

Z is the lead singer for the Like, a retro girl pop band. Her style is characterized by a 1960’s look, short or babydoll skirts/dresses, bright/bold colors (usually reds or yellows) paired with delicate ivory or beige, over stockings/knee socks, contrasting sharply with large and dark eye makeup. 

I copy her eye makeup more days than I don’t (see my post on makeup), and I often use her technique of a delicate, vintage color/pattern next to a bold, modern pop of color. Often normal waisted dresses become babydoll dresses— short, empire waisted— on me due to my bust, and when it looks good, I forgo the belt and finish it off with knee socks and a really long necklace. 

-

Olivia White - Lemonade Mouth

Yes, okay, some of my fashion comes from the Disney Channel. Don’t knock it. To be fair, it accidentally came from the Disney Channel— which is to say, I watched this movie and went, “…She’s wearing my clooootheeesssss, that’s weeeiiiiirrrrd.” Olivia’s fashion is characterized by, hey, wow, look at that, bright but casual skirts and dresses in feminine prints, with high and wide waists, paired with cardigans/vests/shrugs, short leggings, and ridiculous earrings. Much like my daily staples. 

I don’t feel like I need to tell you how I adapt this, because… I don’t. This is what I wear automatically on any given day. Uh. Yeah. 

-

Holland Roden - cast of Teen Wolf

Holland plays Lydia Martin on MTV’s Teen Wolf, which is, incidentally, filmed where I live. Her style is usually very 1950’s, with a lot of red lipstick and accent headbands, high but narrower waists, and bold primary colors, especially yellow. 

I often go for bright lipstick and a contrasting, but equally bright, primary color when I’m wanting to draw from her look. I go for narrower belts than I usually would, and go for sheer stockings or bare legs rather than my usual leggings or patterned tights. 

How do you adapt the styles you love to work for your body and your budget? 

Hello, lovelies! 

So, while I’m aware that most of my Tumblr followers are probably in the twenty-something crowd, I’ve been recently informed that most of my followers are, in fact, not— not on Tumblr, and not twenty-somethings! Some of you have come up to me and expressed some doubt that my ideas apply outside of my age bracket, and I’m here this week to address that concern. 

The truth is, if you wear what I wear, yes, you might look a little bit like you’re dressing “too young.” I’m not suggesting that you wear what I wear! Frankly, above-the-knee poofy skirts usually stop being appropriate at a certain age, and, while I’m not going to be the one to pinpoint that age, I think most of us will agree that it exists— with exceptions, of course, for particular women or particular skirts. I’m not saying that a 55 year old woman should never show off her knees; I’m just saying that, if she were going to, I don’t know that I’d advise a layered crinoline look— I would go, instead, with something gracefully pleated, and probably in a muted color or interesting pattern, with a brighter color for a top. (Example of how an above-the-knee skirt can still look mature is pictured above, however, because it can work.)

The easiest way to take my normal wardrobe staples— knee-ish length skirt, tucked in top, and wide belt— and make them more age-appropriate for the more temporally advanced among you, is, of course, to lengthen the hem a little, reduce some of the poof, and mix in some more “mature” colors and patterns— cranberry over magenta, sage over lime, salmon over tangerine, rose over hot pink, but not entirely disregarding the always-marvelous joys of turquoise, cherry red, spring green, or violet. It’s not that these colors are for older people; they bring a sense of maturity to any outfit— for instance, if I wear lime green and hot pink, people are going to assume I’m younger than I am, but if I go for sage green and lavender, I’m going to be treated as older. Believe me. I’ve tested it— even the maturity of the gentlemen paying attention to me changes. In the neon outfit, I get teenage boys, high schoolers and younger college students complimenting my chest and waggling their eyebrows. In the more sedate outfit, I get later twenty-and-thirty-somethings asking for my number. So, if you’re already more mature, it’s not a bad thing to dress to match; it’s not dressing “old,” it’s dressing to send the right message. There is, of course, a middle ground— neutral tones with a pop of color— but remember, the color (or pattern) you choose says something. That’s not bad; it’s just good to know what, exactly, it’s saying— let your clothes talk to you. But not in a weird, serial killer, “burn things and hurt people way.” Look at your clothes and be like, “Clothes, tell me what I should know about you!” And that orange crop top from the eighties will say, “Madame, you should know that I belong in the back of your closet, not on your body.” And your gorgeous lace blouse will say, “I would look very pretty under a brightly colored cardigan or wrap!” And your knee-high (but flat soled) boots will chime in, “I make everything look classy and adventuresome at the same time! Wear me, wear me!”  

I hope that helps a little! Have a good week, lovelies. ^__^ 

Hey, everyone—

So, Dragoncon has eaten my life, but it spat me back out this morning, mostly alive, but still kind of limping from the frantic costume-crunch week beforehand. 

I can’t give you a post today, but there’ll be a bonus post this weekend, and we’ll resume our normal schedule on Tuesday. Apologies for the delay, and I hope you all have an excellent week! 

<3 

Anonymous asked: I just read your post on patterns and prints where you mention making your own fascinators. Would you mind writing a post on that? It's something I'd love to try myself, but I'm not sure where to start.

Absolutely! I made a few for Dragoncon this past weekend; I’ll see if I can take some pictures and pull a post together. ^__^ 

chozomidna asked: This blog empowers me. You really know the types of fashion that will flatter all body types, and I appreciate that you give advice and attention to each one equally. You are thorough in your advice, and you explain WHY certain types of clothes work to accentuate curves. Instead of focusing on how women with curves can hide the parts they don't like, you focus on how women can dress themselves in a way that will make them look their best and therefore feel very good. Thank you for this blog. :)

<3 Hearing this means so much to me, thank you! Honestly, writing this blog has been a huge, constant reminder to myself that it’s okay to feel good about myself, and its wonderful to hear that it’s empowering someone else, too. I try really hard to do all the things you just listed, so it’s really gratifying to hear that it’s coming through. ^__^ Thank you so much for writing to me, it absolutely made my day. 

Hello, all! I apologize for the late-ish post; it’s the first week of classes, and here at GSU, that means a lot of running around, sleep deprivation, and drama with the class selection system. It doesn’t leave a whole lot of time for thinking deep thoughts about fashion, unfortunately. 

I did, however, immediately color code my closet upon moving in. We’ll see if that lasts longer than the first two weeks. It doesn’t seem likely, but I like to pretend that I’m incredibly classy and organized. My roommate should be laughing right about now. 

closet!

See that? ORGANIZED. Uh huh. Oh yeah.

Anyways. I was going to do a post about party dresses (party season, aka, fall semester is starting! It seemed appropriate), but a friend of mine requested a post on swimwear, and as it’s one of the last few weeks that can rightfully be called summer, I thought I’d get on that while it’s still conceivably relevant to those of us above the equator. 

I’m breaking our bodies down to three basic shapes for the purposes of this post, because the alternative is to go bathing suit shopping with each and every one of you, and while I would probably enjoy the everliving heck out of myself doing that, I have, y’know…classes to go to. If you don’t feel like this covers your body type adequately, shoot me a message, and I’ll address your specific situation. Overall, I’m assuming we’re wearing one piece swimwear, mostly because I don’t really like two pieces on anyone, and also because wearing them when you’re not completely flat all over is tricky to make generalizations about— it’s more of a case-by-case thing, and I feel like I can be more helpful to more people if I can speak in broader terms. 

First of all, let’s take a look at my body type, because, well, frankly, I know the most about it, because it’s mine. …Yes, that sentence just happened, right there. Shh, I haven’t slept properly in a while now. 

Top Heavy Ladies! This one is for those among us who are blessed with abundance in the bust area, and maybe a bit in the midriff area as well, but who tend to go in more than out on our bottom half. (Flat butts run in my family, okay, I am fully aware that my butt is not a giant mural of majesty.)
For us, there’s this awesome thing that exists— bathing suits with frilly little skirts.

Try to go for something that has sturdy straps, if you can help it— when bathing suits get wet, they tend to lose a lot of their support (which you’d think designers would take into account, since the primary function of bathing suits is to, yknow, get wet), so it’s important to pick something that’s still going to give you a little help holding your boobs up when the water hits it. Halter straps can be awesome for that, but the bigger your chest is, the more careful you need to be with that— don’t hurt your neck just for the sake of a proper cleavage display.

If you have a bigger tummy, go for a suit with ruching over the stomach— it prevents the fabric from clinging too much, and it’s somehow magically more flattering. (And, because I hated it when I used to read fashion blogs and they’d use words I didn’t know— like, for the longest time, I could not figure out what the heck “peplum” was, okay, it’s a ridiculous word— Ruching is a sewing technique in which fabric or ribbon is gathered to form ruffles or petals. Now you know.)

The little skirt or bottom-ruffle or whatever gives the illusion that we have more hips/butt than we do, completing the curve of our silhouettes, the ruching hides our bellies, and the sturdy strap holds up our awesome chests.

If you have breasts that are really far apart— another thing I’ve got going on— and would rather a more traditional “Y” of cleavage, try for something with a tight band around the bust, as well as a halter strap. It’ll let you push your boobs together without making them fall out of your suit. Most patterns are okay, and this is definitely the time for polka dots and stripes— they both widen in wider places, so they emphasize our busts while making the rest of us look narrower. Try to avoid anything that ties (our chests are heavy, so knots at the back of the neck hurt), anything with a top composed of two triangles (most boobs aren’t triangular, and these have little to no support), halters that anchor between the boobs (no support at all), and anything with a “french cut” (these look good on almost no one).

So, to wrap up for the top heavy ladies: 
Do’s: sturdy straps, halters, ruffly skirt thingies, ruching, polka dots and stripes (or other repetitive patterning)
Don’t’s: ties, triangle tops, between-boob-anchoring halters, french cuts

 

Okay. NEXT. Let me address the

Bottom Heavy Ladies! Alright, so. My roommate is a lady whose butt is, in fact, a giant mural of majesty, but she’s got a pretty flat tummy, so she still wears two pieces, and will thus be absolutely no help to me for the sake of this post. For the purposes of this post, bottom heavy ladies are those who are endowed with a mermaid shape— smaller on the top, with a big bottom curve to round you out, with varying tummy sizes. 

The first awesome thing created for bottom heavy ladies is… the lower half of most swimsuits. Most bathing suits are cut with the assumption that your bust is smaller than your hips, and so base the line of the suit on the curve of that body type. This means that you get to focus a little bit more on the upper half, without having to worry about finding a suit with a ruffly little skirt like the top heavy ladies do. 

You also don’t have to worry as much about straps! Strapless suits, suits with between the boob halter straps, and triangle tops are totally open to you. If you’re trying to make your chest look bigger, try to veer more towards suits with ruching at the top, ruffles at the bust, a pattern/color change in the bust area (like, say, a black suit with a floral patterned bust band), and suits with a fascinator between the breasts (those ones held together at the top with a metal ring, for instance), or something with a band right under the bust, dividing it from the waistline and therefore bringing the bust out more. 

Try to stay away from polka dots on the lower half of the suit, as well as stripes and other small patterning— they stretch, because swimsuit fabric is stretchy! That means that at the top, you have teeeeeeny tiny polka dots/stripes/etc, and at the bottom, you have really big polka dots/stripes/etc, emphasizing the extra width at the bottom in a weird way. I’m not saying it’s bad to emphasize your butt/hips/etc— just that there are classy, attractive ways to do it, and slowly growing polka dots is maybe not one of those ways. instead, try to shoot for more simplistic patterning— color blocking, solid color, or something irregular, like zebra print— or, if you’re going to do stripes, look for wide, diagonal ones, like so: 

Side swipey suits (the kind that have a pull of fabric from one side to the other) are also something to avoid— they make the waist look wider, despite hiding the belly a little. Try to steer clear of the butt ruffles that the top heavy ladies are looking for— on them, they give them a butt; on you, they give you…two butts. You have a butt! Enjoy it. Don’t add an extra one. Also try to make sure that the leg holes aren’t too wide— the same reason that top heavy ladies shouldn’t wear triangle tops! You have a gift; don’t let it fall out of your swimsuit.

So, to wrap up, for the bottom heavy ladies: 
Do’s: strapless, triangle tops, between the boob fascinators or halters, solid colors or irregular patterning like zebra stripes, ruching, bust ruffles
Don’ts: small/repetitive patterning, side swipey cuts (there’s a picture below if you have no idea what I’m talking about), butt ruffles

Alright! Third and final body type here. 

Hourglass Ladies! For the purposes of this post, a lady with an hourglass figure means big at the top AND at the bottom— regardless of how many hours your hourglass is, that’s still what we’re calling it. 

Hourglass ladies have the luxury of wearing the same normal bottom cut that the bottom heavy ladies get, though they still have to hunt for the same support in the top area that the top heavy ladies require. This, at least, is a little easier to find, because you’re still part of the shape that swimwear makers are…sort of taking into account when making suits. 

Try to steer clear of butt ruffles, for the same reason the bottom heavy ladies do. Go for wide bust bands, but try to avoid empire waisted color changes— it makes the bottom half seem very separate from the bust, and since you have a more symmetrical body shape, that’s kind of awkward looking. If you have a big tummy, still look for things with ruching, but you can also look for things with full skirts if you’re feeling more modest— 

This kind is awkward on the top heavy ladies, because it emphasizes their lack of hips; on an hourglass figure, it can drape elegantly without making you feel exposed. You can also get away with almost any kind of patterning— polka dots are awesome, unless they’re the really big kind (steer away from dots bigger than quarters). Make sure you keep your bust supported, and steer clear of the same kinds of tops that top heavy ladies need to avoid. 

To sum up, for hourglass ladies:
Do’s: simple bottoms with smooth lines, ruching, sturdy tops, interesting patterns, full skirts
Don’t’s: empire waisted color blocking, butt ruffles, all the bust cuts top heavy ladies need to avoid

So, that mostly finishes us out, though I want to add a couple things that apply to all body types before I go. 

-make sure any dividing lines/color changes/pulls in are at the waist or right below the bust, not below (at the hips or under the belly). 

-please, please, please never wear those weird, overlapping tank top two pieces. Please. They look terrible. They look terrible on every single person alive, skinny or curvy, and you are worth so much more than the hideousness of those things. Please. 

Happy swimming, ladies; enjoy what’s left of summer! <3

Staples of a Curvy Closet: 5 Things You Should Have
1. A pair of good, sturdy black ballet flats. I do not mean the $5 ones at Walmart that fall apart after you wear them twice. At least shell out for the $14 ones at Target. They can pull together a lot of different outfits without killing your feet and back like heels do, and if you do wear heels, it doesn&#8217;t hurt to keep a pair of flats in your bag, just in case. 

2. A trademark. Whether it&#8217;s a signature color, pattern, accessory, or makeup style, pick something that when people see it, they go, &#8220;Oh, that reminds me of _______.&#8221; Mine? I have a couple, but the biggest one, the one that gets people&#8217;s attention all the time, that makes people stop me on the street to give me compliments? Glitter. I wear glitter every single time I leave the house. My favorite brand is Poly*Flake, which you can find for about $3 at your local Hobby Lobby. 

3. A good hat. Everyone needs one hat that, when they put it on, makes them invincible. An adventuring hat, if you will. Mine is a black sunhat that I added yellow silk roses and gold ribbons to. If you can&#8217;t buy one awesome enough, buy a boring one and make it fancy. 

4. One good piece of lingerie. Something that, when you put it on, makes you feel like you belong in a magazine. It doesn&#8217;t matter if there&#8217;s anyone who&#8217;s going to see it. It&#8217;s important to HAVE one. Mine looks kind of like this, but hot pink: 

5. An evening/ball gown. Get it secondhand, from a thrift store, or cheap at Ross (I&#8217;ve gotten one for $15), but have something that, in the event that you&#8217;re invited to the Prince&#8217;s ball, you can put it on and be the person that draws everyone&#8217;s eye. Something that, when you put it on, you&#8217;re immediately a character in a fairy tale. I&#8217;ve had more days than I&#8217;d like to admit where I wake up and feel hilariously unattractive and boring. My solution on those days? Pretend I&#8217;m going to an incredibly fancy event, put on a gigantically poofy gown, and wear it out all day, and if people ask what the occasion is, I make something important-sounding up. Yes, I lie. That happens. Sometimes I convince my friends to all do it with me, and then we go out for dinner or coffee and act like we&#8217;ve just come back from some hilariously fancy party. Is that ridiculous? Heck yes it is. Does it also work? You bet it does.

Staples of a Curvy Closet: 5 Things You Should Have

1. A pair of good, sturdy black ballet flats. I do not mean the $5 ones at Walmart that fall apart after you wear them twice. At least shell out for the $14 ones at Target. They can pull together a lot of different outfits without killing your feet and back like heels do, and if you do wear heels, it doesn’t hurt to keep a pair of flats in your bag, just in case. 

2. A trademark. Whether it’s a signature color, pattern, accessory, or makeup style, pick something that when people see it, they go, “Oh, that reminds me of _______.” Mine? I have a couple, but the biggest one, the one that gets people’s attention all the time, that makes people stop me on the street to give me compliments? Glitter. I wear glitter every single time I leave the house. My favorite brand is Poly*Flake, which you can find for about $3 at your local Hobby Lobby. 

3. A good hat. Everyone needs one hat that, when they put it on, makes them invincible. An adventuring hat, if you will. Mine is a black sunhat that I added yellow silk roses and gold ribbons to. If you can’t buy one awesome enough, buy a boring one and make it fancy. 

4. One good piece of lingerie. Something that, when you put it on, makes you feel like you belong in a magazine. It doesn’t matter if there’s anyone who’s going to see it. It’s important to HAVE one. Mine looks kind of like this, but hot pink: 

5. An evening/ball gown. Get it secondhand, from a thrift store, or cheap at Ross (I’ve gotten one for $15), but have something that, in the event that you’re invited to the Prince’s ball, you can put it on and be the person that draws everyone’s eye. Something that, when you put it on, you’re immediately a character in a fairy tale. I’ve had more days than I’d like to admit where I wake up and feel hilariously unattractive and boring. My solution on those days? Pretend I’m going to an incredibly fancy event, put on a gigantically poofy gown, and wear it out all day, and if people ask what the occasion is, I make something important-sounding up. Yes, I lie. That happens. Sometimes I convince my friends to all do it with me, and then we go out for dinner or coffee and act like we’ve just come back from some hilariously fancy party. Is that ridiculous? Heck yes it is. Does it also work? You bet it does.

Fashion Q & A

Q: I was wondering if you could suggest how to play up my body style. Like, I have a smaller bust, my butts not small but compared to my fairly large thighs and hips, it sure seems that way. So what could or would you suggest to accentuate that? I dont really have a set style. I could wear a sporty outfit, a chic one, a punk one, a grungey one, and a girly one all in one week. I think thats mostly because I cant seem to find clothes to make my good parts look better. Im trying to love my curves :)
Oh, and if it helps, I am always very fond of the more vintage/tea party look, like you were describing in your last post with the florals. I totally agree with you that florals are amazing and I love wearing them, even though I can never seem to find room in my outfits that look good for floral. :3 I do have a big tummy. (I swear, this is my last ask… hopefully. I know, I’m dying of mortification myself right now..)

A: Don’t be mortified! That’s a totally excellent question/request. ^__^ While a picture would help, I’ll try to advise you as well as I can from the description. What colors do you like to wear? To start with, I’d go for some tighter tops, preferably the Jersey knit kind— they tend to cling to curves, which isn’t great on the lower half of our bodies, but can accentuate a smaller bosom and make what’s there seem bigger. Always tuck Jersey knit shirts in, or they cling weirdly over your tummy. ^_^ You can find them in all sorts of prints for pretty much any season, to go with whatever style you’re going for on any given day. You can do a vest that buttons under the bust, too, to accentuate your bust and angle your waist in.Then I’d go with a lightweight high waisted skirt with a lining— it’ll drape elegantly over your belly, draw in your waist without poofing too much over your hips, while still adding a little volume to your behind to give you a nice hourglass figure. Something like this, kind of:  
If you’re worried about your thighs being “large,” you can wear some black leggings or tights to make them seem narrower and also keep them from rubbing together. 

Thanks so much for writing in; I hope this helps! Feel free to ask any follow up questions you have.